⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ 4 Main Working Relationships In Health And Social Care

Friday, July 16, 2021 11:41:33 AM

4 Main Working Relationships In Health And Social Care



EG: 4 main working relationships in health and social care adults have impairments which mean that they need 4 main working relationships in health and social care to 4 main working relationships in health and social care current barriers to existing services in order to choose how to achieve a safer life. This may include an investigation EG: a criminal or disciplinary investigation. Working partners My work place Racialized Mass Incarceration Analysis for elderly people with dementia. You may also find these 4 main working relationships in health and social care helpful Lead Person Centres Practice. Anyone can access them and they should be readily available for anyone that wishes Divergent Thinking Examples see them. You will be cared for in a clean environment where you are protected from infection.

Describe different working relationships in care settings

Our work to support children who are looked after. Our chosen or 'curated' research about the number who are looked after. Help us to improve the Residential child care worker resource by telling us what you think about it in our short four question survey. Last updated: 26 November The importance of relationships to children living in residential child care. Find out more about the importance of relationships to children living in residential child care. Page contents. Why are relationships important to young people living in residential care? Young people have a legal right to maintain relationships Which relationships are important to young people? Useful resources importance of relationships to children living in res care We want your feedback.

Not forming positive relationships with the children you care for can lead to: challenging behaviour placement instability a continuing cycle of rejection and instability for that child. Young people have a legal right to maintain relationships. Which relationships are important to young people? Young people have strong views about who they wish to have a relationship with. Brain injuries Learning disabilities Coma Legally a competent adult can either give or refuse consent to care, even if that refusal may result in harm to harm to them.

You must respect their refusal just as much as they would their consent. It is important that the person is fully informed with regards the consequences of their refusal EG: medication has been refused. If an individual refuses to give consent a record should be made. If an individual lacks the Mental Capacity to give consent to care. The Mental Capacity Act allows people over the age of 16 to appoint a proxy decision maker. The primary purpose of the MCA is to promote and safeguard decision making within a legal framework. It does this in two ways: By empowering people to make decisions for themselves wherever possible and by protecting people who lack capacity by providing a flexible framework that places individuals at the heart of the decision making process.

By allowing people to look ahead for a time in the future when they might lack the capacity for any number of reasons. Person centred planning can be a life changing, enriching experience and is now evidenced based practice. Recent research Robertson et al, has shown that person centred planning is associated with benefits for individuals and led to significant changes in the areas of social networks, contact with family, contact with friends, community based activities, scheduled day activities and levels of choice. Wellbeing and quality of life for most people is enhanced through meaningful involvement and activity. It is crucial that individuals are involved in decisions that affect them. There are many ways in which such involvement can be facilitated and encouraged.

Services should recognise the importance of social contact and companionship and on-going links with social networks. Your organisation should support continued community involvement, easy access to transport and the opportunity to participate in social and leisure activities. Maintaining social contact is also important to social identity and fulfilment. Active support is a proven model of support that encourages people with learning disabilities to plan the best use of their time, with the correct level of support to engage or participate in all activities that make day -to-day living.

It empowers and motivates, changing the focus of support from caring for to supporting and working with. Active support underpins all areas of health and social care as it is so person-centred values into action. Active participation is an approach that enables individuals to be included in their care and have a greater say in how they live their life in ways that matter to them. The benefits of active participation can be divided into primary benefits and secondary benefits. Primary benefits include: Physical benefits including greater activity levels. Increased independence and autonomy in what people do.

An opportunity for individuals in health and social care settings to have a say in matters of direct concern to their lives. Increased opportunities for social contact and interpersonal relationships. Encouraging involvement and self-awareness. Individuals become more involved in the community and more aware of opportunities and what they can hope for themselves. Increased opportunities for learning and development of important skills, knowledge, education and employment. Enhanced wellbeing with increases in self-confidence, self-esteem and self-belief. The benefits of active participation included the above primary benefits where the individual gains from its application in real world of health and social care practice but there are also some secondary benefits.

The secondary benefits: can be described as benefits that occur as a result of active participation but are not a direct aim of active participation. These included: Decreasing the likelihood of abuse. As the individual engages positively by actively participating is area of their life, such as in personal care, the scope for abuse by others is reduced. Decreasing vulnerability. As individuals gain in their self-confidence and self-esteem they are less prone to exploitation and harm from others. Conclusion: Active participation is an approach that empowers individuals in the activities and relationships of everyday life leading to them living as independently as possible.

The importance to the individual as an active partner in their own care or support is that it brings physical, psychological, relational and over all wellbeing benefits. Service user participation has resulted in an impact upon the service users, themselves, the organisation and also what the organisation does. For individual service users, the benefits of participation may include increased confidence and self-esteem, the chance to acquire new skills and improved material resources if, for example it helps them to acquire paid employment.

Participation leads to greater satisfaction and improved quality of life for instance, older people mental health service users and people with disabilities who have had greater control in decisions about the support they receive, report greater satisfaction and better health than those who have not. Today caregivers are adopting outcomes based practice methods to achieve desired patient care goals. Outcomes based practice sometimes called outcomes management involves a combination of teamwork, continuous quality improvement and process and outcome measurement. Outcome based care is about putting the person at the centre of the care service and not prescribing a standard service to everyone.

It is about delivering meaningful outcomes to every individual and helping people to lead more fulfilling lives. Outcome based care requires careful planning which involves working with the people who use our services to help them identify and achieve the things they want to do. Delivered well, outcome based care increases interest and motivation and creates the enthusiasm needed to support people to lead a more fulfilling life. Key benefits of outcome based care:. The service users desires, aspirations, abilities and talents are explored and utilised to help ensure they lead a more fulfilling life.

It empowers care workers to work more closely with service users to understand how best to enable their independence. The service can respond more easily to changing needs and preferences. It contributes to maintaining a service users independence. It enables service users to exercise more choice and have more flexibility in the day-to-day delivery of their service. It encourages partnership working between all stakeholders involved in the delivery and management of an individuals care. It uses resources such as funding and time to gather effect.

It provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of services. A fundamental part of outcome based care is looking for opportunities to support people in activity throughout the day. This means thinking about the activities that need to be completed- key tasks such as personal care, travel or meal preparation. The practice of outcome based care ensures that service users are involved in their daily living choices, no matter what their physical or mental ability. Of course not everyone using our support services can undertake all tasks independently, people need different levels of support. The role of the care worker is to provide enough support to enable the service users successful participation. A key principle of outcome based care is helping service users to engage little and often so that they build up experiences of success and increase their motivation.

Outcome based practice was introduced as a new way of working. Outcomes in a social care context are concerned with quality of life rather than simply levels of ability, health, employment or housing status. At a community level this can be about people feeling safer, people being healthier, communities being stronger. At an individual level outcomes can be framed in terms of the steps a person needs to take in order to improve aspects of their lives relating to their own safety and security. Outcome based practice:. Offers a framework for strategic planning and enables all stakeholders, commissioners, service providers and communities alike, to improve the lives of children, young people, families and adults.

Helps identify the activities that will make the most difference to individuals and communities. Can be used to improve the improve the performance of programmes, agencies and service systems through compelling links between service activity and outcomes for users. Can dramatically improve partnership working by creating a common language, shared ownership and maximising the contribution of all stakeholders.

Outcome based practice focuses on the individuals goals and steers the carer away from a needs based care delivery. It also has measurable aims and objectives where needs based care has not. The work becomes driven and specific because there is a goal in mind. This meant the care professional needed to come to terms with this new way of delivering services. They illustrate the logic, theory of change and anticipated flow of an intervention, providing markers against which both incremental and ultimate progress may be measured Models:. A logic model generally includes the target group, the resources to be used activities and objectives. Best used for describing a program in the broadest strokes, it can be an extremely useful tool particularly at the earliest stages of a project.

It encourages funders to think like investors and encourages programs to shift from emphasizing service activities to focusing on performance targets, defined in terms of client changes gained. The model also uses milestones, or sequential steps toward achieving ultimate targets, to allow for ongoing assessment and mid-course program corrections. RBA first describes what a desired result would look like, then defines that result in measurable terms and finally uses those measures to gauge success or failure. RBA asks and answers three basic questions, what do we want, how will we recognize it, what will it take to get there. This model distinguishes between population accountability and program accountability. Its inclusion of the crosswalk, a tool for matching RBA with other outcome models, is a unique and useful aspect of the framework.

It helps answer four basic questions: why have a program, how should it be conducted, has the program design been implemented, what are the benefits delivered. Health and social care is increasingly moving towards outcomes-based services. An outcome describes the measurable impact of the service on a persons life. This represents a major shift in the way services are designed, commissioned, delivered and evaluated. The importance of outcomes in social care has been widely recognized for many years. A focus on outcomes which encourages service users to express the outcomes they want for themselves provides scope for user empowerment and choice. It involves moving from a traditional activity-based approach to serve planning and delivery to a more flexible and responsive model where new thinking is needed about how to measure success.

Outcomes based approach is used as a means of improving performance, accountability and consistency in service provision which can only result in positive changes in individuals lives. Outcomes refer to the impacts and end results of services on service users. They may be general EG: improve the health of older people or individualized and person-centred where they based on the priorities and aspirations of individuals. Whether or not outcomes are perceived as successful may depend not just on the activities and skills of service providers and care managers but also on the goals and expectations of service users.

By involving people in thinking and planning for their own services it also creates a more responsive service which is able to respond to users changing needs and preferences. Outcomes will be monitored and reviewed regularly to ensure the service is continuing to meet the service users wishes and needs. EG: whilst the overarching outcome might be for an individual to regain independence and control over his own life, progress may be better monitored if there are a series of bite-sized outcomes such as being able to: Make a simple meal.

Dress and undress without help Wash or shower on their own Organise own shopping needs And so on for the whole range of other activities of daily living. This is likely to give the individual a more rapid sense of achievement as areas of independence and regained. Benefits of outcome focused care planning:. Promotes independence and responsibility empowerment Improves use of key social work skills- communication, negotiation, partnership working, task or goal centred planning ect. Enables people to exercise some choice and control which will hopefully lead to an improved quality of life. Treating people as individuals- feeling valued and respected. Compatibility with and respect for cultural and religious preferences. Raises expectations within the community about what can be achieved and promotes the use of the community as a resource.

Prompts you to consider different ways of meeting need and achieving outcomes. As manager this applies to both your staff and the people in our care. General well-being does simply mean that you are free from anxiety and depression. People with long-term physical health conditions will often have psychological and emotional needs resulting from the burden of illness-related symptoms, the disability associated with the physical illness and the impact of living with more than one physical condition at any time. The links between physical and mental health are clear.

There are shared risk factors for illness: illness regularly presents with both psychological and physical symptoms and being physically ill, particularly on a chronic basis, often has an impact on mental health and psychological wellbeing. The concept of holistic health and well-being incorporates several different facets including physical, intellectual, emotional and social. Theories relating to the psychological basis for well-being: Well-being is a dynamic cincept that includes subjective, social and psychological dimensions as well as health related behaviours. The Ryff Scales of psychological well-being is a theoretically grounded instrument that specifically focuses on measuring multiple facets of psychological well-being.

Definitions of Theory-Guided Dimensions of well-being:. Self-acceptance High scorer: possesses a positive attitude towards the self acknowledges and accepts multiple aspects of self, including good and bad qualities, feels positive about past life. Lower scorer: feels dissatisfied with self, is disappointed with what has occurred with past life. Is troubled about certain personal qualities, wishes to be different than what he or she is. Positive relations with others. High scorer: has warm, satisfying, trusting relationships with others, is concerned about the welfare of others, capable of strong empathy, affection, and intimacy, understands give and take of human relationships. Low scorer: has few close, trusting relationships with others, finds it difficult to be warm, open and concerned about others, is isolated and frustrated in interpersonal relationships, not willing to make compromises to sustain important ties with others.

High scorer: is self-determining and independent, able to resist social pressures to think and act in certain ways, regulates behaviour from within, evaluates self by personal standards. Lower scorer: is concerned about the expectations and evaluations of others, relies on judgments of others to make important decisions, conforms to social pressures to think and act in certain ways. Environmental mastery. High scorer: has a sense of mastery and competence in managing the environment, controls complex array of external activities, makes effective use of surrounding opportunities, able to choose or create contexts suitable to personal needs and values. Low scorer: has difficulty managing everyday affairs, feels unable to change or improving surrounding context, is unaware of surrounding opportunities, lacks sense of control over external world.

Purpose in life. High scorer: has goals in life and a sense of directedness, feels there is meaning to present and past life, holds beliefs that give life purpose, has aims and objectives for living. Low scorer: lacks a sense of meaning in life, has few goals or aims, lacks sense of direction, does not see purpose of past life, has no outlook or beliefs that give life meaning. Personal growth. High scorer: has a feeling of continued development, sees self as growing and expanding, is open to new experiences, has sense of realizing his or her potential, sees improvement in self and behaviour over time, is changing in ways that reflect more self-knowledge and effectiveness.

Low scorer: has a sense of personal stagnation, lacks sense of improvement or expansion over time, feels bored and uninterested with life, feels unable to develop new attitudes or behaviours. An informed choice means that a person has the information and support to think the choice through and to understand what the reasonably expected consequences may be of making that choice. It is important to remember that too much information is presented to them. Professionals and organisations must be able to demonstrate that they have taken these individual needs into account.

Enabling people to make informed choices does not mean the local authority or provider organisation should abdicate its responsibility to ensure people have a good quality of life. EG: if a person chooses to stay in bed all day, every day, the local authority or provider organisation has a responsibility to explore what is happening and respond to this appropriately, working to ensure that the individual fully understands the consequences of their decision. It is not acceptable to simply accept such a decision at face value if this would put the individual at significant risk, as acts of omission can be considered to be abusive.

It is important to involve people in decisions even when they do not use speech as their main means of communication. Person centred planning techniques point us towards many ways of listening to people in different ways other than relying on what they actually say, using tools such as learning logs, communication charts and supported decision making agreements and these should all be utilised if we are to demonstrate that we have truly attempted to communicate effectively with an individual.

It is also imperative that professionals and organisations ensure that the views of others who know and care about the person are invited and taken into account in any decision making process, without these taking precedence over the individuals views and wishes. Where we are supporting people who have complex communication needs, person centred approaches are essential to ensure peoples involement in decisions which affect their lives.

The steps to follow to ensure the individual has choice and control over decisions, when discussing outcomes they wish to achieve should be: Step 1. Ensure who the individual wishes to be present and involved in any discussions and meetings. Step 2 Ensure the individual understands the process as you proceed and can communicate their wishes. Step 3 Seek consent from the individual to access information from others such as social worker, hospital. Never break confidentiality with others. Step 4 Record everything discussed and check the individual agrees with your records by asking them to sign an agreement. Step 5 Be open to feedback and regular evaluation and review of the plan to ensure it is working.

Individuals needs and preferences constantly change. A typical day probably involves a race to coordinate resources, provide care, perform procedures, gather data, integrate information, respond to emergencies, solve problems and interact with diverse groups of people. In your role as health care professional you probably face more conflict and greater complexity than any other profession. The challenges of balancing competing interests, philosophies, training backgrounds, the endless quest for adequate resources and the emotional quality of the work you do, means conflicts and dilemmas are bound to occur during the courses of your practice.

It is important to evaluate, manage and intervene by mediating when conflicts may and do impact upon the lives and outcomes of people within the provision. There are various appropriate approaches which can be used to address conflicts and dilemmas. Depending on the circumstances this could take the form of: One to one discussion. Group discussion Using contracts Providing information to inform choices Mentoring for conflict resolution. Part of your role is to develop effective systems and approaches to handle conflicts and dilemmas. Your own provision will have its own regulations, code of practice and conduct, standards and guidance for both employers and employees which will dictate your own roles, responsibilities and accountability when leading others and also when managing working with the individuals family.

There are also local, national, UK European and international legislation, standards, guidance and organisational requirements for the leadership and management of work with individuals, families, carers and significant others, which include: The need to achieve positive outcomes for people. The need to safeguard and protect people from all forms of danger, harm and abuse. Employment practices for the provision and service. Data protection, recording and reporting. Making and dealing with comments and complaints to improve services. Whistle blowing. Equality and diversity. These all affect the way you work with individuals and their families.

People are not simply placed in pre-existing services and expected to adjust, rather the service strives to adjust to the person. Write down what you do to support them. Unit 6: PWCS 25 Understand the role of 4 main working relationships in health and social care health and social care worker Introduction The aim of this workbook is to allow you 4 main working relationships in health and social care present evidence for the criteria listed below. Its inclusion of the crosswalk, a tool for matching RBA with other outcome models, is a unique 4 main working relationships in health and social care useful aspect 4 main working relationships in health and social care the Mexican Cristeros War. Of course not everyone using Teenage Brain Research support services can undertake all tasks independently, people need different levels of Andrew Johnsons Seizure.

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